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Alcohol Addiction Treatment

It isn’t always easy to recognize when your consumption of alcohol has crossed the line from social or moderate use to a drinking problem. However, if you drink alcohol to avoid feeling bad or cope with difficulties, you are within potentially harmful territory. Alcohol abuse and alcoholism may sneak up on you; therefore, it is vital to be alert to the warning signs and take measures to cut back if you see them. Understanding the issue includes the first measure in beating it.Enter your Icon Box content here

Understanding alcohol abuse and alcoholism

Alcohol abuse and alcoholism are caused by multiple interconnected factors that include how you were raised, genetics, social environment, and emotional health. A few racial groups, like Native Alaskans and American Indians, are more at risk than other races of developing an addiction to alcohol. People with a family history of alcoholism or who closely associate with heavy drinkers will be more likely to develop a habit of heavy drinking. Lastly, the ones suffering with a mental health issue like bipolar disorder, depression or anxiety also are especially at risk, because alcohol might be used for self-medicating purposes

Do you have a problem with drinking?

You might have a problem with drinking if:

  • You feel ashamed or guilty concerning your drinking.
  • You lie to other people or conceal your drinking habits.
  • You have family members or friends who are concerned about your drinking.
  • You have to have a drink to feel better or relax.
  • You experience a ‘black out’ or don’t recall what you did as you were drinking.
  • You consistently drink more than you thought you would.

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The road from alcohol abuse to alcoholism

As you heavily drink, the body becomes accustomed to the alcohol and will experience withdrawal symptoms if it is taken away. They include:

  • Headache
  • Loss of appetite
  • Fatigue
  • Irritability
  • Depression
  • Insomnia
  • Vomiting and nausea
  • Sweating
  • Trembling or shakiness
  • Jumpiness or anxiety
  • In serious cases, alcohol withdrawal also can involve confusion, hallucinations, agitation, fever and seizures.

Effects of alcohol abuse and alcoholism

Alcohol abuse and alcoholism may affect every aspect of your life. Alcohol use in the long-term may lead to severe health complications that affects virtually all organs in the body that include your brain. Problem drinking also can damage your finances, emotional stability, career, and capability of building and sustaining satisfying relationships. Alcohol abuse and alcoholism also may have an impact on friends, family, and coworkers.

Effects of alcohol abuse and alcoholism

Alcohol abuse and alcoholism may affect every aspect of your life. Alcohol use in the long-term may lead to severe health complications that affects virtually all organs in the body that include your brain. Problem drinking also can damage your finances, emotional stability, career, and capability of building and sustaining satisfying relationships. Alcohol abuse and alcoholism also may have an impact on friends, family, and coworkers.

Effects of alcohol abuse and alcoholism on those you love

In spite of the potentially fatal damage that heavy drinking will do to your body—including liver disease, heart problems and cancer—the social results may be just as devastating. Alcohol abusers and alcoholics are more likely to get divorced, experience issues with domestic violence, have trouble with unemployment, and reside in poverty.

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Obtaining assistance for alcohol abuse and alcoholism

If you are prepared to confess that you have a problem with drinking, you have already taken the initial step. It will take tremendous courage and strength to face alcoholism and alcohol abuse head on. The second step includes reaching out for support.

Assisting a loved one with alcohol abuse or alcoholism

If somebody you love has a problem with drinking you might be experiencing numerous painful emotions that include self-blame, anger, fear and shame. The issue might be so overwhelming that it may seem simpler to be in denial. However, in the long term denying it is going to be more damaging to you, additional members in the family, and the individual who has the problem with drinking.

Treatment for Alcohol Addiction

Locate the proper treatment for you. Multiple effective treatment options for alcoholics are out there, including rehabilitation programs. But, professional assistance is not the only way for you to get better. There also are an abundance of things to do to aid yourself in stopping drinking and achieving lasting recovery.

Selecting an Alcohol Treatment Program

As you evaluate one of the multiple kinds of alcohol treatment programs, keep in mind that everybody’s needs will be different. Generally, the more intense and longer the alcohol use, the more intense and longer the treatment you might require.

Irrespective of the program’s length in months or weeks, long-term follow-up and support are key to recovery. Quality treatment programs not only address the drinking problem, yet they also address the emotional pain and additional life struggles which contribute to the drinking.

Alcohol Treatment Program Types

Residential treatment – This involves residing at a treatment facility as you undergo intensive treatment in the daytime. Residential treatment typically lasts from thirty to ninety days.

Partial hospitalization – This is for those requiring ongoing medical observation yet possess a stable living situation. Such programs typically meet in the hospital for three to five days per week, four to six hours a day.

IOP (Intensive outpatient program)- Not a live-in program, yet will still requires a huge time commitment. IOPs typically meet at least three days per week for two to four hours per day or more. The concentration is on relapse prevention. Such programs often are scheduled around school or work.

Family, Group or Individual Counseling – Works ideally in conjunction with additional kinds of treatment or as a follow-up support. Therapy may assist you in identifying the root cause(s) of the alcohol use, mend your relationships, as well as learn healthier skills of coping.

Sober living – Usually follows intensive treatment such as residential treatment. You reside with other alcoholics and addicts in recovery in a supportive drug-and alcohol-free environment. Such facilities are helpful if you have no place to go or you are concerned that going back home too soon is going to lead to a relapse.

Brief intervention – Suitable for the ones at risk for alcoholism or alcohol abuse, not the ones who’ve already developed a severe issue. Comprises of multiple visits to the healthcare professional to talk about the strategies for cutting back and the harmful effects of alcohol abuse.

Insurance-Accepted

Paying for Treatment in the United States

Costs for alcohol treatment widely vary depending upon your individual treatment requirements, insurance, and facility. Below are tips to assist you in paying for treatment:

Check with your insurance. Call the number upon the back of the card, if you have insurance to ask about your substance abuse and mental health coverage. Figure out what the out-of-pocket costs are going to be, including co-payment and deductible amounts.Search into programs offering reduced or sliding scale options for payment. The purpose of our website is to provide free support for victims of drug and alcohol abuse and their families. We want to help you find the best care for your needs. We have an around-the-clock call center that assists addicts and their families in finding the most appropriate treatment center for your needs. Other places you can call just pressure you into signing up for their specific facility. We actually assess the needs of each person, consider your resources and insurance (if any) and hold your hand through each step of the process.

Use our inquiry form or contact us at 1 (888) 523-4332 if you or a loved one are looking for an inpatient rehabilitation facility to contact an advisor who can be of assistance.